CENTRALIAN PYTHON
(Morelia bredli)


Adult Female


Yearling Male

Adult Female


Adult Male



Yearling Female


Adult Male

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The Centralian Python, which is often simply referred to as "bredli" by Australian herps, is viewed by many as one of the most beautiful of the python species with its fine reddish-brown scales and cream through pale yellow and black markings. Graeme Gow descibed it as a new species in 1981. In his paper, he noted that they have more dorsal body and head scales than carpet pythons. Centralian pythons are found only in the Northern Territory. They are distributed in and around the MacDonnell Ranges and associated arid hills, such as those of the Hart and James Ranges.

Bredli are a hardy captive species with very few husbandry problems. They are usually extremely good feeders and, while a little bit bitey when young, grow up to become large, gentle and docile animals. In excess of 2.5 meters long with their large, distinct heads and considerable bulk and girth, a big adult can be a spectacular sight.

We have been breeding bredli for well over a decade now and have developed a number of colour forms. Recently, we have been concentrating on a new variety which has less of the brown and black colouration, making it more of a bright red and cream snake. Some yearlings from this strain are shown above, along with the still stunning but more conventional colouring of some of our other blood lines.

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