BLACK HEADED PYTHONS
(Aspidites melanocephalus)


Adult Male Queensland

Hatchling Queensland

Adult Male Arnhem

Adult Female Queensland

Hatchling Queensland


Adult Female Arnhem




Yearling Queensland

 

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Black-headed pythons along with the woma python belong to Aspidites, a genus endemic to Australia. "BHP's" are found across the top third of Australia in a broad range of habitats. In the wild, they spend considerable time in burrows and in captivity will dig their own holes if given a suitable substrate. They can grow quite quickly in captivity and will easily reach up to 2.5 metres in length with a girth the size of a man's upper arm.

While blackheads are a snake that relaxes into captivity well, when they want to they can be a snake with attitude. They take an interest in what is happening around them and are generally very, very enthusiastic feeders, once trained to eat in captivity. Young snakes can be quite touchy and sometimes very difficult to start feeding. First time BHP owners are well advised to purchase only established feeders.

There are few snakes more impressive than a large, healthy black-headed python. They vary considerably over their range, from the more subtly banded brown/gold animals of central Queensland, through the rarely seen spectacular chocolate and cream form from specific areas of coastal Northern Territory, to the smaller almost black and white animals that occur in the Pilbara in Western Australia.

We have been breeding the Queensland form pictured above for the last half a decade. Because of the occassional feeding difficulties, we only sell animals that have been established for some time as reliable feeders, which means we generally sell our BHP's from March through to June.

A few years ago, we obtained some hatchlings whose parents were a lovely example of the NT form. These are pictured above. These BHP's are adults well over 2 metres now and we hope to breed next season.

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